Disciplines

Deep transitions: Emergence, acceleration, stabilization and directionality


Discipline: EAD5986-1

Concentration area: 12139

Number of Credits: 4

Course load:

Theoretical
(Per week)
Practice
(Per week)
Studies
(Per week)
DurationTotal
848360
Goals:
This discipline aims to discuss a new theoretical framework that explains the emergence, acceleration, stabilization and directionality of Deep Transitions. It does so through the synthesis of two literatures that have attempted to explain large-scale and long-term socio-technical change: the Multi-level Perspective (MLP) on socio-technical transitions, and Techno-economic Paradigm (TEP) framework.

Justification:
Industrial society has not only led to high levels of wealth and welfare in the Western world, but also to increasing global ecological degradation and social inequality. The socio-technical systems that underlay contemporary societies have substantially contributed to these outcomes. This discipline proposes that these socio-technical systems are an expression of a limited number of meta-rules that, for the past 250 years, have driven innovation and hence system evolution in a particular direction, thereby constituting the First Deep Transition. Meeting the cumulative social and ecological consequences of the overall direction of the First Deep Transition would require a radical change, not only in socio-technical systems but also in the meta-rules driving their evolution – the Second Deep Transition.

Content:
1. Techno-Economic Paradigm
2. Multi-level Perspective
3. Deep Transitions
4. Deep Transitions in Global South
5. Circular Economy and Sustainable Supply Chains

Avaliation methods:
Essay/article about one of the topics presented

Notes:
Lectures/seminar, with interactive discussions with participants.

Bibliography:
1. C. Perez (2010) Technological revolutions and techno-economic paradigms
Camb. J. Econ., 34 (1) pp. 185-202
2. C. Perez (1983) Structural change and assimilation of new technologies in the economic and social systems Futures, 15 (5) (1983), pp. 357-375
3. F.W. Geels, J. SchotTypology of sociotechnical transition pathways
Res. Policy, 36 (3) (2007), pp. 399-417
4. F.W. Geels, J. SchotThe dynamics of transitions: a socio-technical perspective J. Grin, J. Rotmans, J. Schot in collaboration with F. W. Geels, D. Loorbach (Eds.), Transitions to Sustainable Development: New Directions in the Study of Long Term Transformative Change, Routledge, New York (2010), pp. 11-101
5. J. Schot, A. RipInventing the power of modernization J. Schot, H. Lintsen, A. Rip (Eds.), Technology and the Making of the Netherlands: The Age of Contested Modernization, 1890–1970, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA (2010), pp. 13-46
6. L. Fuenfschilling, C. BinzGlobal Socio-technical Regimes. CIRCLE Papers in Innovation Studies, Paper No. 2017/01 (Available online: http://wp.circle.lu.se/upload/CIRCLE/workingpapers/201701_fuenfschilling_et_al.pdf)
7. L. Fuenfschilling, B. TrufferThe structuration of socio-technical regimes –conceptual foundations from institutional theory
Res. Policy, 43 (4) (2014), pp. 772-791
8. Govindan, K., Soleimani, H., Kannan, D., (2015) Reverse logistics and closed loop supply chain: A comprehensive review to explore the future. European Journal of Operational Research 240 (2015) 603–626: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2014.07.0129.
9. Guide, V. D. R. & Wassenhove, L. N. V., (2009) The Evolution of Closed loop Supply Chain Research. Operations Research 57(1), pp. 10-18
10. Quariguasi Frota Neto, J., Walther, G., Blfcmhof , J., Van Nunen, J.A.E.E & Spengler, T. (2010). From closed loop to sustainable supply chains: the WEEE case. International Journal of Production Research, 48:15, 4463-4481, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207540902906151
11. Prieto-Sandoval, V., Jaca, C., & Ormazabal, M. (2017). Towards a consensus on the circular economy. Journal of Cleaner Production.
12. Schot, J. , Kanger, L.Deep transitions: Emergence, acceleration, stabilization and directionality. Research Policy (2018), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2018.03.009